Library Loot (30 November 2011)

Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Marg from The Adventures of an Intrepid Reader that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library.

Yikes it’s been a crazy windy couple of days. My pots of plants blown down, leaves and slippers all over the backyard. Good day to stay home. Luckily I hit the library real quick yesterday while wee reader was having a nap (and the husband was home to watch him).

I’ve been struck with graphic novel fever!

Aya– Marguerite Abouet adn Clement Oubrerie
Thanks to Buried in Print

Ivory Coast, 1978. Family and friends gather at Aya’s house every evening to watch the country’s first television ad campaign promoting the fortifying effects of Solibra, “the strong man’s beer.” It’s a golden time, and the nation, too–an oasis of affluence and stability in West Africa–seems fueled by something wondrous.Who’s to know that the Ivorian miracle is nearing its end? In the sun-warmed streets of working-class Yopougon, aka Yop City, holidays are around the corner, the open-air bars and discos are starting to fill up, and trouble of a different kind is about to raise eyebrows. At night, an empty table in the market square under the stars is all the privacy young lovers can hope for, and what happens there is soon everybody’s business.

Aya tells the story of its nineteen-year-old heroine, the studious and clear-sighted Aya, her easygoing friends Adjoua and Bintou, and their meddling relatives and neighbors. It’s a breezy and wryly funny account of the desire for joy and freedom, and of the simple pleasures and private troubles of everyday life in Yop City. An unpretentious and gently humorous story of an Africa we rarely see-spirited, hopeful, and resilient–Aya won the 2006 award for Best First Album at the Angoulême International Comics Festival. Clément Oubrerie’s warm colors and energetic, playful lines connect expressively with Marguerite Abouet’s vibrant writing.

The Plain Janes – Cecil Castellucci and Jim Rugg

When transfer student Jane is forced to move from the confines of Metro City to Suburbia, she thinks her life is over. But there in the lunch room at the reject table she finds her tribe: three other girls named Jane. Main Jane encourages them to form a secret art gang and paint the town P.L.A.I.N. — People Loving Art In Neighborhoods. But can art attacks really save the hell that is high school?

Buffy The Vampire Slayer: Wolves at the Gate
I couldn’t find volume two (just requested it from another branch) but decided to go ahead and pick up volumes three and four first!

Vampires that, at will, can transform into wolves, panthers, insects, or fog invade the Slayer base of operations in northern Scotland, and not only walk away unscathed, but in possession of Buffy’s scythe, the symbol of Slayer power worldwide. Buffy and the Slayer-legion travel to Tokyo in order to learn more about their dangerous new foes, as Xander journeys to Transylvania to solicit the only person they’ve ever known to possess such power – Dracula!

Buffy the Vampire Slayer: Time of Your Life

Willow and Buffy head to New York City to unlock the secrets of Buffy’s mysterious scythe, when something goes terribly awry. Buffy is propelled into a dystopian future where there’s only one Slayer – Fray, the title character of Joss Whedon’s 2001 series, the first comic he ever wrote. Their uneasy alliance falls apart, leading to the death of a major character from the TV series, while back in the twenty-first century, the Scotland base falls prey to a mystical bomb courtesy of the Biggest Bad – Twilight!

Well-behaved Women Seldom Make History – Laurel Thatcher Ulrich

From admired historian—and coiner of one of feminism’s most popular slogans—Laurel Thatcher Ulrich comes an exploration of what it means for women to make history.

In 1976, in an obscure scholarly article, Ulrich wrote, “Well behaved women seldom make history.” Today these words appear on t-shirts, mugs, bumper stickers, greeting cards, and all sorts of Web sites and blogs. Ulrich explains how that happened and what it means by looking back at women of the past who challenged the way history was written. She ranges from the fifteenth-century writer Christine de Pizan, who wrote The Book of the City of Ladies, to the twentieth century’s Virginia Woolf, author of A Room of One’s Own. Ulrich updates their attempts to reimagine female possibilities and looks at the women who didn’t try to make history but did. And she concludes by showing how the 1970s activists who created “second-wave feminism” also created a renaissance in the study of history.


Have you read any of these books? What did you think of them?
See more Library Loot here.

6 Comments

  1. Yay: I’m sure you’ll enjoy Aya (when you decide to read on, be sure to ask for books two AND three because there is a cliffhanger at the end of the second). Y’know…I’ve never read any of the Buffy graphic novels…not sure why, because I loved the series. Is there a proper place to begin?

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    1. Thanks for the tip! I will have to remember that.

      As for Buffy: I wasn’t quite sure whether I would enjoy ‘Season 8’ at first. And in truth, I did prefer Tales of the Slayers (essentially of the other non-Buffy slayers, which offered a nice aspect to the Buffy series). Season 8 is, well, as the title suggests, a continuation of the TV series, of sorts. The first volume was not too bad, so I thought I’d continue on.

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