Library Loot (31 May 2013)

 Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Marg from The Adventures of an Intrepid Reader that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library.

The wee readers hit the library on Friday. There was a toddler song and storytime session that grandma and wee reader attended. While wee-er reader and I wandered the aisles and checked out the books (ok so that was just me, someone was asleep). I didn’t dare pick up too many books as I have plenty of e-books on the kindle!

Shades of milk and honey – Mary Robinette Kowal

Have been wanting to read this for a while!

shadesmilkhoney

Shades of Milk and Honey is an intimate portrait of Jane Ellsworth, a woman ahead of her time in a version of Regency England where the manipulation of glamour is considered an essential skill for a lady of quality. But despite the prevalence of magic in everyday life, other aspects of Dorchester’s society are not that different: Jane and her sister Melody’s lives still revolve around vying for the attentions of eligible men.

Jane resists this fate, and rightly so: while her skill with glamour is remarkable, it is her sister who is fair of face, and therefore wins the lion’s share of the attention. At the ripe old age of twenty-eight, Jane has resigned herself to being invisible forever. But when her family’s honor is threatened, she finds that she must push her skills to the limit in order to set things right–and, in the process, accidentally wanders into a love story of her own.

Breasts: a natural and unnatural history – Florence Wilson

A rather apt book for these months that I’m putting mine to good use!

breasts

Did you know that breast milk contains substances similar to cannabis? Or that it’s sold on the Internet for 262 times the price of oil? Feted and fetishized, the breast is an evolutionary masterpiece. But in the modern world, the breast is changing. Breasts are getting bigger, arriving earlier, and attracting newfangled chemicals. Increasingly, the odds are stacked against us in the struggle with breast cancer, even among men. What makes breasts so mercurial—and so vulnerable?

In this informative and highly entertaining account, intrepid science reporter Florence Williams sets out to uncover the latest scientific findings from the fields of anthropology, biology, and medicine. Her investigation follows the life cycle of the breast from puberty to pregnancy to menopause, taking her from a plastic surgeon’s office where she learns about the importance of cup size in Texas to the laboratory where she discovers the presence of environmental toxins in her own breast milk. The result is a fascinating exploration of where breasts came from, where they have ended up, and what we can do to save them

And some e-books
Girls in white dresses – Jennifer Close

whitedresses

Wickedly hilarious and utterly recognizable, Girls in White Dresses tells the story of three women grappling with heartbreak and career change, family pressure and new love—all while suffering through an endless round of weddings and bridal showers.

Isabella, Mary, and Lauren feel like everyone they know is getting married. On Sunday after Sunday, at bridal shower after bridal shower, they coo over toasters, collect ribbons and wrapping paper, eat minuscule sandwiches and doll-sized cakes. They wear pastel dresses and drink champagne by the case, but amid the celebration these women have their own lives to contend with: Isabella is working at a mailing-list company, dizzy with the mixed signals of a boss who claims she’s on a diet but has Isabella file all morning if she forgets to bring her a chocolate muffin. Mary thinks she might cry with happiness when she finally meets a nice guy who loves his mother, only to realize he’ll never love Mary quite as much. And Lauren, a waitress at a Midtown bar, swears up and down she won’t fall for the sleazy bartender—a promise that his dirty blond curls and perfect vodka sodas make hard to keep.

With a wry sense of humor, Jennifer Close brings us through those thrilling, bewildering, what-on-earth-am-I-going-to-do-with-my-life years of early adulthood. These are the years when everyone else seems to have a plan, a great job, and an appropriate boyfriend, while Isabella has a blind date with a gay man, Mary has a crush on her boss, and Lauren has a goldfish named Willard. Through boozy family holidays and disastrous ski vacations, relationships lost to politics and relationships found in pet stores, Girls in White Dresses pulls us deep inside the circle of these friends, perfectly capturing the wild frustrations and soaring joys of modern life

Hotel on the corner of bitter and sweet – Jamie Ford

hotelcorner

In the opening pages of Jamie Ford’s stunning debut novel, Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet, Henry Lee comes upon a crowd gathered outside the Panama Hotel, once the gateway to Seattle’s Japantown. It has been boarded up for decades, but now the new owner has made an incredible discovery: the belongings of Japanese families, left when they were rounded up and sent to internment camps during World War II. As Henry looks on, the owner opens a Japanese parasol.

This simple act takes old Henry Lee back to the 1940s, at the height of the war, when young Henry’s world is a jumble of confusion and excitement, and to his father, who is obsessed with the war in China and having Henry grow up American. While “scholarshipping” at the exclusive Rainier Elementary, where the white kids ignore him, Henry meets Keiko Okabe, a young Japanese American student. Amid the chaos of blackouts, curfews, and FBI raids, Henry and Keiko forge a bond of friendship – and innocent love – that transcends the long-standing prejudices of their Old World ancestors. And after Keiko and her family are swept up in the evacuations to the internment camps, she and Henry are left only with the hope that the war will end, and that their promise to each other will be kept.

Forty years later, Henry Lee is certain that the parasol belonged to Keiko. In the hotel’s dark dusty basement he begins looking for signs of the Okabe family’s belongings and for a long-lost object whose value he cannot begin to measure. Now a widower, Henry is still trying to find his voice – words that might explain the actions of his nationalistic father; words that might bridge the gap between him and his modern, Chinese American son; words that might help him confront the choices he made many years ago.

Set during one of the most conflicted and volatile times in American history, Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet is an extraordinary story of commitment and enduring hope. In Henry and Keiko, Jamie Ford has created an unforgettable duo whose story teaches us of the power of forgiveness and the human heart

The two wee readers got some loot as well.

digger

Digger to the rescue – Mandy Archer ; illustrated by Martha Lightfoot (already a favorite!)

trainsgo

Trains go – Steve Light

beepbeep

Beep beep – Petr Horacek

countasaurus

Countasaurus by Megan E. Bryant ; illustrated by Luciana Navarro Powell

redtrain

Red train by Will Grace ; illustrated by Ed Vere

yawn

Yawn – Sally Symes ; pictures Nick Sharratt

 

tummies

Tummies! –  Sarah Albee ; illustrated by Christopher Moroney

busyfingers

Busy fingers – C.W. Bowie ; illustrated by Fred Willingham

What did you get from the library this week?

 

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7 thoughts on “Library Loot (31 May 2013)

  1. Breasts! I meant to read that when I first heard about it but then I totally forgot it existed. Thanks for the reminder, I’m putting it on my wishlist right this minute 🙂

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  2. I really enjoyed Hotel On The Corner of Bitter and Sweet. Breasts sounds fascinating. I’ll have to keep an eye out for it.

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  3. I’ve had The Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet on my Nook for an embarrassingly long time. It was my community’s “One Book” summer read a few years ago, and I’ve never finished! Ack! It wasn’t bad. Quite the contrary. Need to get my ducks in a row, stick a post-it on my nightstand, and try to remember to read it properly.

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    1. I managed to finish it but it never really clicked with me. I think that somehow the title elevated my expectations for the book – as in because it had such a wonderful title I was expecting it to be so much more than it could ever be. If that makes sense!

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