Library Loot (21 February 2014)

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library

Plenty of graphic novels for me, and picture books for the kids!

Same difference – Derek Kirk Kim
samedifference

When Derek Kirk Kim (The Eternal Smile) published his debut graphic novel back in 2003, it made an immediate stir. The story about a group of young people navigating adulthood and personal relationships is told with such sympathy and perception that the book was immediately hailed as an important new work.

Seven years later, it’s clear that Same Difference has won a place among the great literature of the last decade. It stands not only with Fun Home, Persepolis, and American Born Chinese as a lasting graphic novel, but with much of the best fiction of this young century. Derek’s distinctive voice as an author, coupled with his clear, crisp, expressive art has made this story a classic. And this classic is now back in print, in a deluxe edition from First Second

Nylon Road: a graphic memoir of coming of age in Iran – Parsua Bashi
nylonroad

In the tradition of graphic memoirs such as Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis, comes the story of a young Iranian woman’s struggles with growing up under Shiite Law, her journey into adulthood, and the daughter whom she had to leave behind when she left Iran. NYLON ROAD is a window into the soul of a culture that we are still struggling to understand. Beautifully told, poignant, this is a powerful work about the necessity of freedom.

A game for swallows: to die, to leave, to return – Zeina Abirached
gameswallows

When Zeina was born, the civil war in Lebanon had been going on for six years, so it’s just a normal part of life for her and her parents and her little brother. The city of Beirut is cut in two, separated by bricks and sandbags and threatened by snipers and shelling. East Beirut is for Christians, and West Beirut is for Muslims. When Zeina’s parents don’t return one afternoon from a visit to the other half of the city, and the bombing grows ever closer, the neighbors in her apartment house create a world indoors for Zeina and her brother where it’s comfy and safe, where they can share cooking lessons and games and gossip. Together they try to make it through a dramatic day in the one place they hoped they would always be safehome. Zeina Abirached, born into a Lebanese Christian family in 1981, has collected her childhood recollections of Beirut in a warm story about the strength of family and community.

The dead boy detectives – Ed Brubaker
deadboydetectives

Collected for the first time, this tale stars Edwin and Charles from THE SANDMAN: SEASON OF MISTS. Their first case involves a string of grisly murders — and the immortal Hob Gadling.

Epileptic – David B
epileptic

David B. was born Pierre-François Beauchard in a small town near Orléans, France. He spent an idyllic early childhood playing with the neighborhood kids and, along with his older brother, Jean-Christophe, ganging up on his little sister, Florence. But their lives changed abruptly when Jean-Christophe was struck with epilepsy at age eleven. In search of a cure, their parents dragged the family to acupuncturists and magnetic therapists, to mediums and macrobiotic communes. But every new cure ended in disappointment as Jean-Christophe, after brief periods of remission, would only get worse.

Angry at his brother for abandoning him and at all the quacks who offered them false hope, Pierre-François learned to cope by drawing fantastically elaborate battle scenes, creating images that provide a fascinating window into his interior life. An honest and horrifying portrait of the disease and of the pain and fear it sowed in the family, Epileptic is also a moving depiction of one family’s intricate history. Through flashbacks, we are introduced to the stories of Pierre-François’s grandparents and we relive his grandfathers’ experiences in both World Wars. We follow Pierre-François through his childhood, adolescence, and adulthood, all the while charting his complicated relationship with his brother and Jean-Christophe”s losing battle with epilepsy. Illustrated with beautiful and striking black-and-white images, Epileptic is as astonishing, intimate, and heartbreaking as the best literary memoir.

Great books for boys: more than 600 books for boys 2 to 14 – Kathleen Odean

Always good to have more books to add to my list!
greatbooksboys

BOOKS THAT WILL MAKE BOYS WANT TO READ!

Parents, grandparents, teachers, and librarians–we need a tool that guides us to the books that will inspire boys to read and keep them coming back for more. Now Kathleen Odean, a former member of the Caldecott and Newbery Award committees and author of the groundbreaking bestseller Great Books for Girls has compiled and annotated a unique collection of more than six hundred books–picture books, novels, mysteries, biographies, sports books, and more–that will fascinate and educate boys. Here are classic characters such as Frog and Toad, Bilbo Baggins, and Encyclopedia Brown; new favorites such as Bingo Brown, Martin the Warrior, and Harry the Dirty Dog; and real-life inspirations such as the Wright brothers, Jackie Robinson, and Jacques Cousteau.

The boys who discover reading from the books in this invaluable volume will witness a wide range of role models–and embark upon an adventure that will fuel their dreams for the rest of their lives.

A couple of e-books:

The Foreigner – Francie Lin

foreigner

Winner of the Edgar® Award for Best First Novel by an American Author

Set against the Taiwanese criminal underworld, The Foreigner is Francie Lin’s audacious debut novel. A noirish tale about family, fraternity, conscience, and the curious gulf between a man’s culture and his deepest self

Emerson Chang is a mild mannered bachelor on the cusp of forty, a financial analyst in a neatly pressed suit, a child of Taiwanese immigrants who doesn’t speak a word of Chinese, and, well, a virgin. His only real family is his mother, whose subtle manipulations have kept him close–all in the name of preserving an obscure idea of family and culture.

But when his mother suddenly dies, Emerson sets out for Taipei to scatter her ashes, and to convey a surprising inheritance to his younger brother, Little P. Now enmeshed in the Taiwanese criminal underworld, Little P seems to be running some very shady business out of his uncle’s karaoke bar, and he conceals a secret–a crime that has not only severed him from his family, but may have annihilated his conscience. Hoping to appease both the living and the dead, Emerson isn’t about to give up the inheritance until he uncovers Little P’s past, and saves what is left of his family.

The Foreigner is a darkly comic tale of crime and contrition, and a riveting story about what it means to be a foreigner–even in one’s own family.

Zahrah the wind seeker – Nnedi Okorafor-Mbachu

zahrah

In the northern Ooni Kingdom, fear of the unknown runs deep, and children born dada are rumored to have special powers. Thirteen-year-old Zahrah Tsami feels like a normal girls life.

– she grows her own flora computer; has mirrors sewn onto her cloths; and stays clear of the Forbidden Greeny Jungle.

But unlike other kids in the village of Kirki , Zahrah was born with the telling dadalocks.

The Wee Readers’ loot:
oceanbabies
Ocean babies – Deborah Lee Rose; illustrated by Hiroe Nakata
bigboxben
Big box for Ben – Deborah Bruss; Tomek Bogacki
dannysdrawingbook
Danny’s drawing book – Sue Heap
redgreenblue
Red green blue: a first book of colors – Alison Jay
boats
Boats: speeding! Sailing! Cruising! – Patricia Hubbell; Megan Halsey and Sean Addy
snails
Let’s look at Snails – Laura Hamilton Waxman
stripes
Stripes of all types – Susan Stockdale
brownrabbitcity
Brown rabbit in the city – Natalie Russell
seeyoudreams
I’ll see you in my dreams – Mavis Jukes; Stacey Schuett
pssst
Pssst! – Adam Rex

What did you get from your library this week?

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3 thoughts on “Library Loot (21 February 2014)

  1. Oh my goodness, what an awesome haul!!! I adored A Game for Swallows so much! And really enjoyed Same Difference too. I’ve got both Epileptic and Nylon Road on my TBR pile too. I’ve never heard of The Dead Boy Detectives, but now I *must* find it! And what a pile of beautiful picture books–you’re making me want to hit the children’s room at the library…it’s been a while. Hope you enjoy all your lovely library reads!

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    1. Ah I forgot all about crediting you for some of these books! I added Game for Swallows, Nylon Road, and Epileptic, to my list thanks to your post!

      If you do poke around the children’s section, I’d recommend Pssst! It’s really cute with great illustrations.

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