Library Loot (April 11 2014)

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library.

My library loots these days are mostly picture and board books. I did get quite a few books for myself last week but forgot to post! Anyway, just two real books for me and one e-book, while I try to finish previous weeks’ loots! The baby didn’t get much of a morning nap and was falling asleep in the stroller, so we made it a real quick one (well as quick as one can with a toddler trying to look at everything – he’s always intrigued by the computers and by the new cushioned stools that are shaped as jigsaw pieces. Then there are the windows to look out, and other kids to stare at. And the wooden puzzles laid out on the tables in the kids section. Of course on the way home, the baby fell asleep in the car…

 

Huntress- Malinda Lo

huntress

Nature is out of balance in the human world. The sun hasn’t shone in years, and crops are failing. Worse yet, strange and hostile creatures have begun to appear. The people’s survival hangs in the balance.

To solve the crisis, the oracle stones are cast, and Kaede and Taisin, two seventeen-year-old girls, are picked to go on a dangerous and unheard-of journey to Tanlili, the city of the Fairy Queen. Taisin is a sage, thrumming with magic, and Kaede is of the earth, without a speck of the otherworldly. And yet the two girls’ destinies are drawn together during the mission. As members of their party succumb to unearthly attacks and fairy tricks, the two come to rely on each other and even begin to fall in love. But the Kingdom needs only one huntress to save it, and what it takes could tear Kaede and Taisin apart forever.

Fairy Tales – E.E. Cummings
fairytalescummings

I’ve been looking for fairy tales to read to the kids

Hans Christian Andersen was the profoundly imaginative writer and storyteller who revolutionized literature for children. He gave us the now standard versions of some traditional fairy tales—with an anarchic twist—but many of his most famous tales sprang directly from his imagination.

The thirty stories here range from exuberant early works such as “The Tinderbox” and “The Emperor’s New Clothes” through poignant masterpieces such as “The Little Mermaid” and “The Ugly Duckling,” to more subversive later tales such as “The Ice maiden” and “The Wood Nymph.”

An e-book:

The Centaur – John Updike

centaur

The Centaur is a modern retelling of the legend of Chiron, the noblest and wisest of the centaurs, who, painfully wounded yet unable to die, gave up his immortality on behalf of Prometheus. In the retelling, Olympus becomes small-town Olinger High School; Chiron is George Caldwell, a science teacher there; and Prometheus is Caldwell’s fifteen-year-old son, Peter. Brilliantly conflating the author’s remembered past with tales from Greek mythology, John Updike translates Chiron’s agonized search for relief into the incidents and accidents of three winter days spent in rural Pennsylvania in 1947. The result, said the judges of the National Book Award, is “a courageous and brilliant account of a conflict in gifts between an inarticulate American father and his highly articulate son.”

Kids’ loot:

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