Library Loot (September 26 2014)

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Linda from Silly Little Mischief that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library.

A very rare solo trip to the library! Whee!

Wee Reader was still in preschool (he goes half day until 1230). The Wee-er Reader was having lunch with Grandma. I had a quick early lunch and popped out to the library before preschool pickup.

Drood – Dan Simmons

So Trish’s Readalong Gang has picked Drood for the next Readalong. I’ve not joined in on a readalong before so I’m not quite sure what to expect. But I have loved Dan Simmons’ varied works like The Abominable, Hyperion, The Terror. Especially The Terror. His books tend to be lengthy, hefty things and so is this one! I’ve had my eye on Drood for a while now and this is as good a time as any to read it!

drood

On June 9, 1865, while traveling by train to London with his secret mistress, 53-year-old Charles Dickens–at the height of his powers and popularity, the most famous and successful novelist in the world and perhaps in the history of the world–hurtled into a disaster that changed his life forever.

Did Dickens begin living a dark double life after the accident? Were his nightly forays into the worst slums ofLondon and his deepening obsession with corpses, crypts, murder, opium dens, the use of lime pits to dissolve bodies, and a hidden subterranean London mere research . . . or something more terrifying?

Just as he did in The Terror, Dan Simmons draws impeccably from history to create a gloriously engaging and terrifying narrative. Based on the historical details of Charles Dickens’s life and narrated by Wilkie Collins (Dickens’s friend, frequent collaborator, and Salieri-style secret rival), DROOD explores the still-unsolved mysteries of the famous author’s last years and may provide the key to Dickens’s final, unfinished work: The Mystery of Edwin Drood.

Chilling, haunting, and utterly original, DROOD is Dan Simmons at his powerful best

 

Shoplifter – Michael Cho

shoplifter
I think I first saw this on BookDragon. It might be a bit too late for Diversiverse though.
Corrina Park used to have big plans.

Studying English literature in college, she imagined writing a successful novel and leading the idealized life of an author. But she’s been working at the same advertising agency for the past five years and the only thing she’s written is . . . copy. Corrina knows there must be more to life, but and she faces the same question as does everyone in her generation: how to find it?

Here is the brilliant debut graphic novel about a young woman’s search for happiness and self-fulfillment in the big city.

E-books:

Bloodchild and other stories – Octavia Butler

bloodchild

It’s been a while since I’ve read Octavia Butler!

A perfect introduction for new readers and a must-have for avid fans, this New York Times Notable Book includes “Bloodchild,” winner of both the Hugo and the Nebula awards, and “Speech Sounds,” winner of the Hugo Award. Appearing in print for the first time, “Amnesty” is a story of a woman named Noah who works to negotiate the tense and co-dependent relationship between humans and a species of invaders. Also new to this collection is “The Book of Martha” which asks: What would you do if God granted you the ability—and responsibility—to save humanity from itself?
Like all of Octavia Butler’s best writing, these works of the imagination are parables of the contemporary world. She proves constant in her vigil, an unblinking pessimist hoping to be proven wrong, and one of contemporary literature’s strongest voices.

Stealing Buddha’s Dinner – Bich Minh Nguyen

stealingbuddhasdinner

As a Vietnamese girl coming of age in Grand Rapids, Michigan, Bich Nguyen is filled with a rapacious hunger for American identity. In the pre-PC era Midwest, where the devoutly Christian blond-haired, blue-eyed Jennifers and Tiffanys reign supreme, Nguyen’s barely conscious desire to belong transmutes into a passion for American food. More exotic seeming than her Buddhist grandmother’s traditional specialties–spring rolls, delicate pancakes stuffed with meats, fried shrimp cakes–the campy, preservative-filled “delicacies” of mainstream America capture her imagination. And in this remarkable book, the glossy branded allure of such American foods as Pringles, Kit Kats, and Toll House cookies become an ingenious metaphor for her struggle to fit in, to become a ?real? American. Beginning with Nguyen’s family’s harrowing migration from Saigon in 1975, “Stealing Buddha’s Dinner” is nostalgic and candid, deeply satisfying and minutely observed, and stands as a unique vision of the immigrant experience and a lyrical ode to how identity is often shaped by the things we long for

Kiddos’ loot:

 

What did you get from your library this week?

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