It’s Monday (November 2, 2020)

Hello, it’s Monday again! Hope you had a nice Halloween weekend. It was a very different Halloween this year, as it probably was for you. We didn’t take the kids trick or treating around the neighbourhood. But we still managed to have fun, in a different way.

On Friday, we went to a friend’s house to do some Halloween art. The kids painted a cute Halloween scene with bats, pumpkins, cats! And we enjoyed pizza, desserts (I made a Meyer lemon meringue pie and chocolate cupcakes).

The husband’s birthday was also this past weekend, we had sushi for lunch. Then we enjoyed some gold grade wagyu ribeye that we had ordered from Snake River Farms. It came shipped in a huge box full of dry ice which ensured the steaks were still frozen solid when we got them. I butter basted the steaks in our cast iron pan. We ate it with asparagus, baked potatoes, mushrooms, salad,

Lots of eating this weekend!

Currently…

Reading:

Watching:

I tried the first episode of the Watchmen series and it was really good! But I have to finish watching a few other things first before getting into this one

Listening:

Finally finished listening to Braiding Sweetgrass (highly recommended!) and am looking for my next audiobook

Eating:

Black Forest cake

Drinking:

Coffee!

Cooking:

After a sinful weekend of eating, I am looking to cook simpler foods this week. Maybe more noodle soups which would be welcome when the temperatures get cooler this week.

Last week:

I read:

Almost-American Girl – Robin Ha

The Boy in the Suitcase (Nina Borg #1) – Lene Kaaberbol

Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teaching of Plants – Robin Wall Kimmerer

Eat A Peach – David Chang

I posted:

Black Forest Cake, Eyeball Cupcakes, and Lemon Meringue Pie (oh my) #WeekendCooking

Library Loot (October 28 to November 3)

Creepy TBR #TopTenTuesday

badge
It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? is a place to meet up and share what you have been, are and about to be reading over the week. This meme started with J Kaye’s Blog   and then was taken up by Sheila from Book Journey. Sheila then passed it on to Kathryn at the Book Date

Black Forest Cake, Eyeball Cupcakes, and Lemon Meringue Pie (oh my) #WeekendCooking

Oh boy, this was a bit of a crazy baking week for me. More like a crazy baking Friday, I guess.

We had been invited to a small Halloween backyard party, complete with pizza and Halloween art. And I’ve been well trained by my mum, and knew that I couldn’t go empty-handed.

So, Meyer Lemon Meringue Pie it was. Since I had quite a few Meyer lemons (albeit tiny ones), from my dwarf Meyer lemon tree. Then I thought, maybe I ought to do something more Halloween-appropriate. I know Meyer lemon season is now really, but the bright lemony yellow fruit doesn’t exactly scream “Halloween!” does it?

Chocolate cupcakes? Decorate them to make them look like eyeballs? I could do that, I thought!

I had made lemon meringue pie a few months back, as I adore lemon meringue pie but had somehow never made it. I had then used the recipe from King Arthur Flour but had not quite cooked the lemon filling as properly as I should have, resulting in a slightly liquid-y filling, but it was delicious though…

I decided to stick with the crust part of that recipe (it is a simple crust using oil, no need to stick the dough in the fridge for hours). But went with the filling from this recipe from Sally’s Baking Addiction – her crust sounds delicious but required shortening which I didn’t have, and several hours’ refrigeration which I didn’t have time for. But since I was using Meyer lemons which are far less tart (and more like a mix of lemon and tangerine, in case you haven’t tried it), I reduced the sugar quite a bit, and added a lot more zest as Meyer lemons smell amazing.

The pie came out wonderfully. The filling held perfectly, and everyone enjoyed it!

Since I was already on the Sally’s Baking Addiction website, I used her chocolate cupcake recipe. The batter was surprisingly thin so I was a bit worried, but it turned out to be a really delicious, moist and chocolate-y cupcake.

(Someone else made apple, peanut butter, marshmallow teeth!)

I also used her Vanilla Buttercream recipe, just 3/4 of it, that is, as I just am not fond of a cupcake that is all buttercream – it looks pretty, but ugh just way too much for me. I went with the lower amount of icing sugar (she gives a range in the recipe), and upped the salt quite a bit, as I really didn’t want it to be too sweet.

Unfortunately, the only food colouring gel I had on hand were pastels, so I had to make do with pinkish bloodshot eyes. 😛

And the final thing to do that day was to finish up the Black Forest cake for the husband’s birthday on Halloween. If you’ve been a reader of my blog for a while, you may know that I make a Black Forest cake every year for the past few years. Here’s the post I did in 2018, one in 2014,  another in 2013 – I didn’t post about it every year, but I have apparently made it since 2013?

Anyway, I use the cake recipe from King Arthur Baking  (and had made the cake layers a couple of days ago, and froze them), and usually I find the sour cherries from Trader Joe’s, but this time they didn’t have any! So I had to resort to frozen regular cherries and made the cherry preserve mixture from Life, Love and Sugar (it did make more than I needed though!) then a simple whipped cream using heavy cream and sugar and a touch of vanilla extract. And decorated with chocolate shavings.

Weekend Cooking was started by Beth Fish Reads and is now hosted by The Intrepid Reader and is open to anyone who has any kind of food-related post to share: Book (novel, nonfiction) reviews, cookbook reviews, movie reviews, recipes, random thoughts, gadgets, quotations, beer, wine, photographs

Library Loot (October 28 to November 3)

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

Happy Library Loot day!

Last week I had forgotten to post about some comics I had borrowed. So here they are:

Heavy Vinyl Vol 1 and 2 by Carly Usdin

When Chris joins the staff at her local record store, she’s surprised to find out that her co-workers share a secret: they’re all members of a secret fight club that take on the patriarchy and fight crime!

Starry-eyed Chris has just started the dream job every outcast kid in town wants: working at Vinyl Mayhem. It’s as rad as she imagined; her boss is BOSS, her co-workers spend their time arguing over music, pushing against the patriarchy, and endlessly trying to form a band. When Rosie Riot, the staff’s favorite singer, mysteriously vanishes the night before her band’s show, Chris discovers her co-workers are doing more than just sorting vinyl . . . Her local indie record store is also a front for a teen girl vigilante fight club! 

It feels like ages since I’ve read Lumberjanes and was so happy to jump back in!

Lumberjanes Volumes 11 to 13 

(This is the synopsis for vol 11)

Time is freezing at camp, and it’s up to Roanoke Cabin to stop the nefarious and mysterious forces behind it. 

When Molly makes a deal with a mysterious Voice in the woods surrounding Miss Qiunzella Thiskwin Penniquiqul Thistle Crumpet’s Camp for Hardcore Lady Types to slow down time, she isn’t hoping for an endless summer! All she wants is more time to spend with her friends at camp, hiking and doing crafts, and playing music and having fun. What she doesn’t bargain for is time starting to skip, and freeze, and make campers’ ages jump forward and back… It’s up to Roanoke Cabin to to set time right again, and save camp! 

I haven’t had the chance to eat at his restaurants but I’ve watched his TV shows, and have some inkling of his background, so I’m curious to know more.

Eat A Peach by David Chang

In 2004, David Chang opened a noodle restaurant named Momofuku in Manhattan’s East Village, not expecting the business to survive its first year. In 2018, he was the owner and chef of his own restaurant empire, with 15 locations from New York to Australia, the star of his own hit Netflix show and podcast, was named one of the most influential people of the 21st century and had a following of over 1.2 million. In this inspiring, honest and heartfelt memoir, Chang shares the extraordinary story of his culinary coming-of-age.

Growing up in Virginia, the son of Korean immigrant parents, Chang struggled with feelings of abandonment, isolation and loneliness throughout his childhood. After failing to find a job after graduating, he convinced his father to loan him money to open a restaurant. Momofuku’s unpretentious air and great-tasting simple staples – ramen bowls and pork buns – earned it rave reviews, culinary awards and before long, Chang had a cult following.

Momofuku’s popularity continued to grow with Chang opening new locations across the U.S. and beyond. In 2009, his Ko restaurant received two Michelin stars and Chang went on to open Milk Bar, Momofuku’s bakery. By 2012, he had become a restaurant mogul with the opening of the Momofuku building in Toronto, encompassing three restaurants and a bar.

Chang’s love of food and cooking remained a constant in his life, despite the adversities he had to overcome. Over the course of his career, the chef struggled with suicidal thoughts, depression and anxiety. He shied away from praise and begged not to be given awards. In Eat a Peach, Chang opens up about his feelings of paranoia, self-confidence and pulls back the curtain on his struggles, failures and learned lessons. Deeply personal, honest and humble, Chang’s story is one of passion and tenacity, against the odds.

What did you get from your library this week?

It’s Monday (October 26, 2020)

The gusty winds roamed the Bay Area last night, rattling and shaking outdoor things with abandon. It felt like a suitable end to a week that has had me struggling to find the right words to convey all my feelings.

My grandmother passed away in Singapore last week, her funeral was on Sunday. I wrote about some of my memories of her and thought about her as we finally made it through the week.

Some other things we did…

7yo’s craft in Chinese. It’s a bowl of longevity noodles and the ingredients he would want in it. He later had to write a paragraph about that.

Currently…

Reading:

S – Koji Suzuki

Watching:

Game of Thrones

Also, with the family, Long Way Up which has Ewan MacGregor and Charley Boorman back together again, this time on electric motorcycles, and the rest of the team in electric trucks, travelling up South America.

Listening:

Still listening to Braiding Sweetgrass. I need to hurry! It’s due back soon and I can’t renew it as someone has a hold on it! Gulp. I am now at 73%.

Eating and drinking:

I had toast and tea for breakfast. It’s a nice chilly morning, so I’m going to make more tea.

Cooking:

The husband’s birthday is this weekend so I’ve been thinking of what to cook. Steak maybe? A risotto with scallops? Both?

But for sure I will be making Black Forest cake.

Last week:

I read:

Lumberjanes Volumes 10 to 12

Heavy Vinyl Vol 1 to 2

The Boy in the Suitcase (Nina Borg #1) by Lene Kaaberbol

I posted:

Mama (1929 to 2020)

The Girl and the Ghost by Hanna Alkaf

Library Loot (October 21 to 27)

Halloween #TopTenTuesday

badge
It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? is a place to meet up and share what you have been, are and about to be reading over the week. This meme started with J Kaye’s Blog   and then was taken up by Sheila from Book Journey. Sheila then passed it on to Kathryn at the Book Date

The Girl and the Ghost by Hanna Alkaf

This was the book I didn’t know I needed last night. I’m not from Malaysia but there are enough similarities between Malaysia and its neighbor Singapore for me to feel at home when I was reading this. I couldn’t sleep last night and while a ghost story wasn’t exactly what I was looking for at that moment, the library ebook was due in a couple of days. So The Girl and the Ghost it would be then

The ghost is a pelesit, a dark spirit who takes the form of a grasshopper to stay hidden. His master, a witch, dies and he has to find a new master. The witch had told him a pelesit needs a master to control his craving for destruction and chaos. As he is bound by blood, the new master has to be of the same blood. And so it is to be Suraya. Suraya is a lonely child, her father is dead and her mother withdrawn.

“Maybe that was what she was. The durian of friends. Maybe people would learn to like her one day. Maybe she just had to meet the right ones.”

So quickly she and Pink become inseparable. But Pink’s dedication to her has a dark side as he lashes out relentlessly at those who bully her, then takes an even darker turn when she makes her first real friend.

It was a dark and endearing read, full of the sights and sounds and smells of Malaysia. It was a beautiful and emotional tale of friendship and family. It made me long for home and made me tear up as I thought of my family and wished I could be there for them, especially this week, with the passing of my grandmother

Library Loot (October 21 to 27)

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libra

Happy Library Loot day!

Claire has the link-up this week

With the exception of the first book, my library haul this week continues with the Readers Imbibing in Peril theme of horror, thriller, mystery, dark fantasy.

Almost American Girl – Robin Ha

A teen graphic novel memoir about a Korean-born, non-English-speaking girl who is abruptly transplanted from Seoul to Huntsville, Alabama, and struggles with extreme culture shock and isolation, until she discovers her passion for comic arts.

For as long as she can remember, it’s been Robin and her mom against the world. Growing up in the 1990s as the only child of a single mother in Seoul, Korea, wasn’t always easy, but it has bonded them fiercely together.

So when a vacation to visit friends in Huntsville, Alabama, unexpectedly becomes a permanent relocation—following her mother’s announcement that she’s getting married—Robin is devastated. Overnight, her life changes. She is dropped into a new school where she doesn’t understand the language and struggles to keep up. She is completely cut off from her friends at home and has no access to her beloved comics. At home, she doesn’t fit in with her new stepfamily. And worst of all, she is furious with the one person she is closest to—her mother.

Then one day Robin’s mother enrolls her in a local comic drawing class, which opens the window to a future Robin could never have imagined.

Frankenstein in Baghdad – Ahmed Saadawi

From the rubble-strewn streets of U.S.-occupied Baghdad, Hadi–a scavenger and an oddball fixture at a local café–collects human body parts and stitches them together to create a corpse. His goal, he claims, is for the government to recognize the parts as people and to give them proper burial. But when the corpse goes missing, a wave of eerie murders sweeps the city, and reports stream in of a horrendous-looking criminal who, though shot, cannot be killed. Hadi soon realizes he’s created a monster, one that needs human flesh to survive–first from the guilty, and then from anyone in its path. A prizewinning novel by “Baghdad’s new literary star” (The New York Times), Frankenstein in Baghdad captures with white-knuckle horror and black humor the surreal reality of contemporary Iraq.

Ok I have no idea why this book has been on my tbr for a long time now, and also, why did I actually press the “borrow” button??? Ring was the first – and last – Japanese horror movie I ever watched in the cinema. It was terrifying! Admittedly, I am not quite a chicken when it comes to horror movies (ie I don’t really like watching them), but I was young and foolish and I guess everyone was talking about the movie and I just HAD to know, and so I went to watch it. And it was the most horrifying thing I have ever seen. I never read the books but for some reason I am going to read this one!

S (Ring #5) – Koji Suzuki (translated from the Japanese)

Twenty-one years after the legendary bestseller Ring, which spawned blockbuster films on both sides of the Pacific, and thirteen years after Birthday, the seeming last word on iconic villain Sadako and her containment, internationally acclaimed master of horror and Shirley Jackson Award-winner Koji Suzuki makes his much awaited returned to the famed trilogy’s mind-blowing story world with a new novel, S.

Takanori Ando, son of Spiral protagonist Mitsuo, works at a small CGI production company and hopes to become a filmmaker one day despite coming from a family of doctors, When he’s tasked by his boss to examine a putatively live-streamed video of a suicide that’s been floating around the internet, the aspiring director takes on more than he bargained for. His lover Akane, an orphan who grew up at a foster-care facility and is now a rookie high-school teacher, ends up watching the clip. She is pregnant, and she is…triggered.

Sinking hooks into our unconscious from its very first pages with its creepy imagery, and rewarding curious fans of the series with clever self-references, here is a fitting sequel to a tale renowned for its ongoing mutations.

The Boy in the Suitcase (Nina Borg #1) – Lene Kaaberbol and Agnete Friis (translated from the Danish)

Nina Borg, a Red Cross nurse, wife, and mother of two, is a compulsive do-gooder who can’t say no when someone asks for help—even when she knows better. When her estranged friend Karin leaves her a key to a public locker in the Copenhagen train station, Nina gets suckered into her most dangerous project yet. Inside the locker is a suitcase, and inside the suitcase is a three-year-old boy: naked and drugged, but alive.

Is the boy a victim of child trafficking? Can he be turned over to authorities, or will they only return him to whoever sold him? When Karin is discovered brutally murdered, Nina realizes that her life and the boy’s are in jeopardy, too. In an increasingly desperate trek across Denmark, Nina tries to figure out who the boy is, where he belongs, and who exactly is trying to hunt him down.

What did you get from your library this week?

Halloween #TopTenTuesday

This week’s Top Ten Tuesday topic is:

(oops I set this to post a week early – this is for next week!. Oh well… it’s an early Halloween post then.)

It’s actually a Halloween freebie this week, and while I am not exactly much of a horror reader, I do enjoy dabbling in creepy reads once autumn sets in. So here are some of my favourite creepy reads of recent years, in no particular order – it’s a short list!

The Luminous Dead by Caitlin Starling

Oh this was so claustrophobic and tense and creepy. And amazingly it has just two characters and one setting – a cave.

Gideon the Ninth – Tamsyn Muir

I hesitate to qualify this as creepy but there are necromancers, witches, skeletons and it tends on the macabre yet it’s so funny and somehow made me feel so happy reading it. Does that sound weird? Not if you’ve read it (and loved it). Also, I am holding out before reading the second book, so don’t say anything about it!

Strange Practice (Greta Helsing #1) – Vivian Shaw

Greta Helsing is a doctor to the “differently alive” – vampires, ghouls, mummies etc. And while that alone is enough for me to go, oooh that sounds great, the book shines with all the other characters who are in it – a vampire, a vampyre, a demon, some ghouls.

The Deep by Alma Katsu (my thoughts here)

The Girl and the Ghost by Hanna Alkaf (my thoughts here)

This unapologetically Malaysian middle-grade book has just the right kind of spooky.



Anything that Joe Hill writes, really. Also, plus his awesome Locke and Key series – which when I passed to the husband to read (many years ago), he said, um this is a bit too morbid for me.


Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018.

It’s Monday (October 19, 2020)

We are back to Monday again, huh. How was your weekend?

It sounds a bit sad that I get excited to see persimmons at the farmers market. But yay! Persimmons! It’s important to take note of the little things sometimes, like the changing of the seasons and with it, the changing of the seasonal fruits. As someone who grew up in Singapore, a tiny country with little room for agriculture, pretty much all of our fruits, vegetables, meat, fish come from other countries like Malaysia, Thailand, and Australia. And as a result – at least at the time I was growing up – produce available in supermarkets wasn’t quite seasonal. After all, we don’t have seasons in the equator (well except monsoon season), and Australian seasons are the reverse to what many of us (more influenced by the US and the UK) typically think of as seasons.

Had some Mexican food for lunch on Saturday. Also margaritas!

But for the kids, I made (for the first time) mango lassi. Frozen mango cubes, Greek yogurt, whole milk, some honey to sweeten it.

Currently…

Reading:

Wintersong – S Jae-Jones

Watching:

Game of Thrones

Great British Bake Off

Listening:

Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teaching of Plants

Eating:

Toast with peanut butter for breakfast

Drinking:

Tea

Cooking:

I have a pork tenderloin in the freezer, so I was thinking of maybe a char siu (Chinese-style barbecue pork) with it. Served with rice and stirfried vegetables.

The leftover charsiu can be used in fried rice, or fried noodles, or on top of instant noodles.

Last week:

I read:

We Are Not Free – Traci Chee

Strange Practice – Vivian Shaw

I posted:

Beef and beer pie #WeekendCooking

Library Loot (October 14 to 20)

Super Long Book Titles #TopTenTuesday

badge
It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? is a place to meet up and share what you have been, are and about to be reading over the week. This meme started with J Kaye’s Blog   and then was taken up by Sheila from Book Journey. Sheila then passed it on to Kathryn at the Book Date

Library Loot (October 14 to 20)

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

Happy Library Loot Day!

Don’t forget to link-up or comment below.

Ikenga – Nnedi Okorafor

Nnedi Okorafor’s first novel for middle grade readers introduces a boy who can access super powers with the help of the magical Ikenga.

Nnamdi’s father was a good chief of police, perhaps the best Kalaria had ever had. He was determined to root out the criminals that had invaded the town. But then he was murdered, and most people believed the Chief of Chiefs, most powerful of the criminals, was responsible. Nnamdi has vowed to avenge his father, but he wonders what a twelve-year-old boy can do. Until a mysterious nighttime meeting, the gift of a magical object that enables super powers, and a charge to use those powers for good changes his life forever. How can he fulfill his mission? How will he learn to control his newfound powers?

Award-winning Nnedi Okorafor, acclaimed for her Akata novels, introduces a new and engaging hero in her first novel for middle grade readers set against a richly textured background of contemporary Nigeria.

So this has been on my TBR list for a while, but nothing I was dying to read. I was recently looking for an audiobook, and while listening to the sample, I really liked listening to the narrator. I guess you could say that her voice was what made me decide to actually download it. Have you downloaded an audiobook just because you liked the narrator’s voice?

Circe – Madeline Miller

In the house of Helios, god of the sun and mightiest of the Titans, a daughter is born. But Circe is a strange child—not powerful, like her father, nor viciously alluring like her mother. Turning to the world of mortals for companionship, she discovers that she does possess power—the power of witchcraft, which can transform rivals into monsters and menace the gods themselves.

Threatened, Zeus banishes her to a deserted island, where she hones her occult craft, tames wild beasts and crosses paths with many of the most famous figures in all of mythology, including the Minotaur, Daedalus and his doomed son Icarus, the murderous Medea, and, of course, wily Odysseus.

But there is danger, too, for a woman who stands alone, and Circe unwittingly draws the wrath of both men and gods, ultimately finding herself pitted against one of the most terrifying and vengeful of the Olympians. To protect what she loves most, Circe must summon all her strength and choose, once and for all, whether she belongs with the gods she is born from, or the mortals she has come to love.

A reading challenge made me do it! I think this was for a task that’s outside my usual genres or something like that. And I listened to the audiobook sample for a bit and I really liked it. Her voice is soothing and her knowledge is vast and the narrative style is great. Really enjoying this one.

Braiding Sweetgrass: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge, and the Teaching of Plants – Robin Wall Kimmerer

As a botanist, Robin Wall Kimmerer has been trained to ask questions of nature with the tools of science. As a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation, she embraces the notion that plants and animals are our oldest teachers. In Braiding Sweetgrass, Kimmerer brings these lenses of knowledge together to show that the awakening of a wider ecological consciousness requires the acknowledgment and celebration of our reciprocal relationship with the rest of the living world. For only when we can hear the languages of other beings are we capable of understanding the generosity of the earth, and learning to give our own gifts in return.

What did you get from your library this week?

It’s Monday (October 12, 2020)

My older boy had his first band class! He’s playing the trombone. And we all had a good laugh as he played his first few notes. He’s practising in the guest room which is a bit away from the rest of the house…

Lots of baking last week…

Walnut bread on the left, chocolate babka on the right

Some dishes from this Malaysian-Burmese restaurant. First time trying Mohinga, which is a fish noodle soup, quite delicious. Apparently Myanmar’s national dish and often eaten for breakfast. The second dish is wat dan hor which in Singapore we know more as hor fun.

We also drove down to Palo Alto for some Shake Shack burgers! It’s funny how we hadn’t eaten out in ages – we do quite a bit of takeout as we want to support our local restaurants (also I can’t cook every single meal). But luckily Shake Shack is in the Stanford Mall so it’s more of an outdoors-type mall and there are plenty of benches to sit (away from pedestrians) and have a meal.

Currently…

Reading:

Watching:

Listening:

Eating:

I had homemade walnut bread for breakfast

Drinking:

Coffee. It’s one of those mornings where I woke up feeling tired!

Cooking:

Last week was a nice cool week but this week is going to be warm once again, so not sure how much oven-style cooking I want to do. Maybe I’ll cook some bibimbap, use any leftover rice to make fried rice. So far that’s what I’ve got.

Last week:

I read:

I posted:

Dim Sum of All Fears

Library Loot (October 7 to 13)

Book Covers with Fall Vibes #TopTenTuesday

badge
It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? is a place to meet up and share what you have been, are and about to be reading over the week. This meme started with J Kaye’s Blog   and then was taken up by Sheila from Book Journey. Sheila then passed it on to Kathryn at the Book Date