Library Loot (April 24 to 30)

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

 

Happy Library Loot day!

What did you get from your library this week? Share it with us – Claire has the link-up!

 

This whole month I’ve been talking about trying to get a better grip on my library loans and reading from my own shelves. That has worked (somewhat) a little bit so far. But this week I caved!

It started with this book, a nonfiction read that I wanted to get into especially after listening to the audiobook of Crenshaw with my kids (more on that in another post). In that middle grade book, the family gets evicted and I was talking to my boys about that, explaining what that means. And it made me realise that I haven’t yet read this:

Evicted – Matthew Desmond

From Harvard sociologist and MacArthur “Genius” Matthew Desmond, a landmark work of scholarship and reportage that will forever change the way we look at poverty in America
 
In this brilliant, heartbreaking book, Matthew Desmond takes us into the poorest neighborhoods of Milwaukee to tell the story of eight families on the edge. Arleen is a single mother trying to raise her two sons on the $20 a month she has left after paying for their rundown apartment. Scott is a gentle nurse consumed by a heroin addiction. Lamar, a man with no legs and a neighborhood full of boys to look after, tries to work his way out of debt. Vanetta participates in a botched stickup after her hours are cut. All are spending almost everything they have on rent, and all have fallen behind.

The fates of these families are in the hands of two landlords: Sherrena Tarver, a former schoolteacher turned inner-city entrepreneur, and Tobin Charney, who runs one of the worst trailer parks in Milwaukee. They loathe some of their tenants and are fond of others, but as Sherrena puts it, “Love don’t pay the bills.” She moves to evict Arleen and her boys a few days before Christmas.

Even in the most desolate areas of American cities, evictions used to be rare. But today, most poor renting families are spending more than half of their income on housing, and eviction has become ordinary, especially for single mothers. In vivid, intimate prose, Desmond provides a ground-level view of one of the most urgent issues facing America today. As we see families forced  into shelters, squalid apartments, or more dangerous neighborhoods, we bear witness to the human cost of America’s vast inequality—and to people’s determination and intelligence in the face of hardship.

Based on years of embedded fieldwork and painstakingly gathered data, this masterful book transforms our understanding of extreme poverty and economic exploitation while providing fresh ideas for solving a devastating, uniquely American problem. Its unforgettable scenes of hope and loss remind us of the centrality of home, without which nothing else is possible.

Slow Days, Fast Company – Eve Babitz

This slim book caught my eye as I scanned the fiction shelves. I love reading books set in California, although SoCal is a far different creature from NorCal.

No one burned hotter than Eve Babitz. Possessing skin that radiated “its own kind of moral laws,” spectacular teeth, and a figure that was the stuff of legend, she seduced seemingly everyone who was anyone in Los Angeles for a long stretch of the 1960s and ’70s. One man proved elusive, however, and so Babitz did what she did best, she wrote him a book. Slow Days, Fast Company is a full-fledged and full-bodied evocation of a bygone Southern California that far exceeds its mash-note premise. In ten sun-baked, Santa Ana wind–swept sketches, Babitz re-creates a Los Angeles of movie stars distraught over their success, socialites on three-day drug binges holed up in the Chateau Marmont, soap-opera actors worried that tomorrow’s script will kill them off, Italian femmes fatales even more fatal than Babitz. And she even leaves LA now and then, spending an afternoon at the house of flawless Orange County suburbanites, a day among the grape pickers of the Central Valley, a weekend in Palm Springs where her dreams of romance fizzle and her only solace is Virginia Woolf. In the end it doesn’t matter if Babitz ever gets the guy—she seduces us.

 

Early Riser – Jasper Fforde

A new Jasper Fforde book! How exciting! Also, love that cover!

Imagine a cold, dark world where all humans must hibernate through the winter, their bodies dangerously close to death as they enter an ultra-low metabolic state of dreamless sleep where their pulse drops close to zero and nerve synapses in the brain fire only enough to prevent irreversible brain damage–all humans, that is, apart from the winter consuls, a group of officers who diligently watch over the vulnerable sleeping citizens.

When junior consul Charlie Worthing is stranded in the forgotten outpost of Sector Twelve, the new recruit hears of a conspiracy–a viral dream spreading among those in the hibernational state that causes paranoia, hallucination, and psychotic episodes that can end in murder. Worthing enters the sleepstate and experiences the dream in all its vivid glory, only to realize on waking that all the people who had known about it before have disappeared. More disturbing, Worthing can recall parts of the viral dream, which shouldn’t be possible. When the dream starts to merge with reality, Charlie begins to question just what’s real…and what isn’t. Bestselling author Jasper Fforde delivers a gripping, brilliantly imagined existential thriller in Early Riser, sure to delight his fans.

 

The kids’ loot:

 

 

Lots of Beast Quest again for the 8yo.

 

What did you get from your library this week?

 

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you). 

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Library Loot (April 17 to 22)

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

 

 

Hello! It’s Wednesday again and it’s time to share with us your library haul!

As this month I’m trying to finish up on some previous borrows, and read more from my shelves, just two books for me this week!

 

American Like Me: Reflections on Life Between Cultures – edited by America Ferrera

I’m listening to this one and it’s such a great audiobook.

An emotionally and politically charged collection of first person accounts from prominent citizens in a variety of fields about their experiences being first generation Americans, with a powerful foreword written by actress and activist America Ferrera.

From award-winning actress and political activist America Ferrera comes an absorbing and fascinating collection of essays written by prominent Americans from a variety of fields about their experiences being first generation Americans. As the daughter of Honduran immigrants, Ferrara is enthusiastic to share dozens of personal stories from notable actors, comedians, athletes, politicians, artists and entrepreneurs about assimilating into American culture while remaining inextricably connected to the mother tongue and the father land. Contributors to the book will include Lin-Manuel Miranda, Roxane Gay, Issa Rae, Kal Penn, Padma Lakshmi, Liza Koshy, Uzo Aduba, Al Madrigal, Anjelah Johnson, Carmen Perez, Wilmer Valderrama, Kumail Nanjiani, Jeremy Lin, Joy Cho, Jenny Zhang, Laurie Hernandez, Michelle Kwan, Ravi Patel, and many others. Ranging from heartfelt to hilarious, the essays in AMERICAN LIKE ME will appeal to anyone from a first generation family; those interested in identity, particularly national identity; and anyone with a complicated relationship to family, culture, and growing up.

Watch Us Rise – Renee Watson Ellen Hagan

Jasmine and Chelsea are sick of the way women are treated even at their progressive NYC high school, so they decide to start a Women’s Rights Club. They post everything online—poems, essays, videos of Chelsea performing her poetry, and Jasmine’s response to the racial macroaggressions she experiences—and soon they go viral. But with such positive support, the club is also targeted by online trolls. When things escalate, the principal shuts the club down. Jasmine and Chelsea will risk everything for their voices—and those of other young women—to be heard.

 

 

The kids’ loot:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What did you get from your library this week?

 

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you). 

Rainy Day Reads #toptentuesday

This week’s Top Ten Tuesday topic is:

 

 

Rainy Day Reads

 

The idea of a rainy day read is a bit puzzling to me. Maybe it’s because I grew up in Southeast Asia where it rains A LOT. And by rain, I mean a heavy storm, the dark clouds looming, the sky shattering with lightning bolts, the booms and cracks of heart-stopping thunder and then the immense heavy rain that pours down for ages and ages. Until it finally stops and it’s ridiculously hot again, just hot and humid and damp all around.

So it’s hard to really qualify a “rainy day” read when it rains so much and you just learn to ignore it and work around it.

I’m going to instead list some book quotes that make me think of rain and rainy days though!

Wuthering Heights – Emily Brontë

“On an afternoon in October, or the beginning of November – a fresh watery afternoon, when the turf and paths were rustling with moist, withered leaves, and the cold blue sky was half hidden by clouds – dark grey streamers, rapidly mounting from the west, and boding abundant rain – I requested my young lady to forego her ramble, because I was certain of showers.”

Norwegian Wood – Haruki Murakami

“When it’s raining like this,” said Naoko, “it feels as if we’re the only ones in the world. I wish it would just keep raining so the three of us could stay together.”

The Fiery Cross – Diana Gabaldon

I’m sure there are many instances of rain in The Outlander series, but I’m currently reading this fifth book and there’s plenty of rain in this one!

It had come on to rain: the light spatter of drops on the canvas overhead turned to a regular thrum, and the air grew live with the rush of water. It was a winter storm; no lightning lit the sky, and the looming mountains were invisible.

 

The English Patient – Michael Ondaatje

He is halfway across when he smells the rain, and then it begins to fall all over his body, clinging to him, and suddenly there is the greater weight of his clothes.

She puts her cupped palms out of the window and combs the rain into her hair.

Soul Music – Terry Pratchett
It was raining in the small, mountainous country of Llamedos. It was always raining in Llamedos. Rain was the country’s main export. It had rain mines.

Ceremony – Leslie Marmon Silko

Jungle rain had no beginning or end; it grew like foliage from the sky, branching and arching to the earth, sometimes in solid thickets entangling the islands, and other times, in tendrils of blue mist curling out of coastal clouds.


Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018.

 

 

 

Library Loot (April 10 to 16)

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

 

It’s Wednesday! Happy Library Loot Day!

What did you get from your library this week? Claire has the link-up!

Just a couple of books for me this Library Loot. I’m attempting to read more from my own shelves this month! But since I do co-host this meme, I need something from the library too!

 

Internment – Samira Ahmed

I love this cover. And also, I previously enjoyed Ahmed’s Love Hate and Other Filters

Rebellions are built on hope.

Set in a horrifying near-future United States, seventeen-year-old Layla Amin and her parents are forced into an internment camp for Muslim American citizens.

With the help of newly made friends also trapped within the internment camp, her boyfriend on the outside, and an unexpected alliance, Layla begins a journey to fight for freedom, leading a revolution against the internment camp’s Director and his guards.

Heart-racing and emotional, Internment challenges readers to fight complicit silence that exists in our society today

 

Fearless Females: The Fight for Freedom, Equality, and Sisterhood – Marta Breen

This beautifully illustrated graphic novel tells the stories of fearless females who have fought, and continue to fight, for the rights of women today.

Featuring familiar icons like Harriet Tubman and Malala Yousafzai, and introducing hidden figures like Táhirih, young readers will be fascinated reading about these women activists advocating for equality, education, and bodily integrity all throughout history, and it is sure to inspire a new generation of activists

 

The kids’ loot:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What did you get from your library this week?

 

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you). 

Library Loot (April 3 to 9)

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries

 

 

 

Happy Library Loot day!

This week it’s mainly about catching up with all those library ebooks that I borrowed in the past week.

But I did get a few comics out as it’s readathon weekend! And comics are always great for readathons.

As always, let us know what you got from your library this week!

 

 

 

The Backstagers Vol 1: Rebels Without Applause and Backstagers Vol 2:  – James Tynion , Illustrated by  Rian Sygh

I saw this on Litsy and thought it looked lots of fun.

When Jory transfers to an all-boys private high school, he’s taken in by the only ones who don’t treat him like a new kid, the lowly stage crew known as the Backstagers. Not only does he gain great, lifetime friends, Jory is also introduced to an entire magical world that lives beyond the curtain. With the unpredictable twists and turns of the underground world, the Backstagers venture into the unknown, determined to put together the best play their high school has ever seen.

James Tynion IV (Detective Comics, The Woods) teams up with artist Rian Sygh (Munchkin, Stolen Forest) for an incredibly earnest story that explores what it means to find a place to fit in when you’re kinda an outcast.

 

 

Moonstruck Vol 2: Some Enchanted Evening – Grace Ellis, Shae Beagle, Kat Fajardo

I quite enjoyed Vol 1 and the illustrations were really cute. So here’s Vol 2

Werewolf barista Julie and her supernatural friends try to unwind at a party, but a conniving fraternity of fairy bros has other plans for our heroes. With one of their friends trapped in the frat house and the winter solstice (a notable night of magical mischief) looming ever-closer, it’s up to the amorous werewolves and gregarious centaur to save the day.

The kids’ loot:

 

 

What did you get from your library this week?

 

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you). 

Things That Make Me Pick Up a Book #TopTenTuesday

This week’s Top Ten Tuesday topic is:

Things That Make Me Pick Up a Book

In no order, just simply off the top of my head…

The cover

What can I say, I do indeed judge a book by its cover. And these days, covers are just getting better. Some recent reads that I have picked up because of their covers. Can you blame me? Just look at these beauties!

The writer

I try to read books by women writers and writers with diverse backgrounds. I’m especially drawn to writers from Asia, and especially Southeast Asia where I’m originally from. Pictured are some of the writers whose books I’d automatically pick up, probably without even bothering to read the synopsis!

Reviews from trusted sources

Like my Goodreads friends and some bloggers I’ve followed through the years, like Buried in Print, Captive Reader. And some genre-specific bloggers like SFF blog The Illustrated Page. Also, I’m on Litsy quite a bit and I often pick up books that my fellow Littens rave about.

The award longlists and shortlists

This is a tricky one as there are SO MANY book awards out there. But I do like how they sometimes open my eyes to new-to-me authors. Some of the award news I keep my eye out for include:

FOMO Fear of Missing Out

Yeah, Instagram and Litsy have ruined my reading plans so often. All those pretty book photos and often, of the same books that are just published or about to be published and I have book envy and think, oh I need to read that!

Things that won’t make me pick up a book

Anything that says “for fans of Gone Girl or Girl on the Train”

Or really, titles with “girl”

Also, books for “fans of Fifty Shades”

What about you? What makes you pick up a book?

Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018.

Wundersmith by Jessica Townsend

I was delighted to be back in Nevermoor with Morrigan Crow and her patron Jupiter as she finally enters the prestigious Wundrous Society, the trials of which she passed in the first book. But things aren’t getting any easier for young Morrigan. She might be in the society but all they want to teach her is how evil Wundersmiths like her are. Also people are going missing and someone is blackmailing her class.

This might sound a bit strange if you haven’t read the first book! And why haven’t you read the first book already?? If you like stories that are a little bit quirky and set in a whimsical world, featuring a plucky young girl who’s got a bit of a dark side and who lives in a hotel with its many unusual guests and staff like a giant Magnificat who’s head of housekeeping and a vampire dwarf/party planner. Also, the good people of Nevermoor traverse their city via Brolly Rail.

I adore this series! I love the world building, I love the whimsy but especially that there’s this delightfully dark side to it all