#BookBeginnings #Friday56 -Ceremony by Leslie Marmon Silko

 

Beginning:

Tay didn’t sleep well that night. He tossed in the old iron bed, and the coiled springs kept squeaking even after he lay still again, calling up humid dreams of black night and loud voices rolling him over and over again like debris caught in a flood.

56:

Emo had liked what they showed him: big mortar shells that blew tanks and big trucks to pieces; jagged steel flakes that exploded from the grenades; the way the flame thrower melted a rifle into a shapeless lumps. He understood them right away; he knew what they wanted. He was the best, they told him; some men didn’t like to feel the quiver of the man they were killing; some men got sick when they smelled the blood. But he was the best; he was one of them. The best. United States Army.

 

I don’t think i’ve read a paragraph with as many semi-colons as this one!

 

Fridays are for Book Beginnings on Rose City Reader, Friday 56 on Freda’s Voice

 

 

 

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Library Loot (April 17 to 22)

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

 

 

Hello! It’s Wednesday again and it’s time to share with us your library haul!

As this month I’m trying to finish up on some previous borrows, and read more from my shelves, just two books for me this week!

 

American Like Me: Reflections on Life Between Cultures – edited by America Ferrera

I’m listening to this one and it’s such a great audiobook.

An emotionally and politically charged collection of first person accounts from prominent citizens in a variety of fields about their experiences being first generation Americans, with a powerful foreword written by actress and activist America Ferrera.

From award-winning actress and political activist America Ferrera comes an absorbing and fascinating collection of essays written by prominent Americans from a variety of fields about their experiences being first generation Americans. As the daughter of Honduran immigrants, Ferrara is enthusiastic to share dozens of personal stories from notable actors, comedians, athletes, politicians, artists and entrepreneurs about assimilating into American culture while remaining inextricably connected to the mother tongue and the father land. Contributors to the book will include Lin-Manuel Miranda, Roxane Gay, Issa Rae, Kal Penn, Padma Lakshmi, Liza Koshy, Uzo Aduba, Al Madrigal, Anjelah Johnson, Carmen Perez, Wilmer Valderrama, Kumail Nanjiani, Jeremy Lin, Joy Cho, Jenny Zhang, Laurie Hernandez, Michelle Kwan, Ravi Patel, and many others. Ranging from heartfelt to hilarious, the essays in AMERICAN LIKE ME will appeal to anyone from a first generation family; those interested in identity, particularly national identity; and anyone with a complicated relationship to family, culture, and growing up.

Watch Us Rise – Renee Watson Ellen Hagan

Jasmine and Chelsea are sick of the way women are treated even at their progressive NYC high school, so they decide to start a Women’s Rights Club. They post everything online—poems, essays, videos of Chelsea performing her poetry, and Jasmine’s response to the racial macroaggressions she experiences—and soon they go viral. But with such positive support, the club is also targeted by online trolls. When things escalate, the principal shuts the club down. Jasmine and Chelsea will risk everything for their voices—and those of other young women—to be heard.

 

 

The kids’ loot:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What did you get from your library this week?

 

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you). 

Rainy Day Reads #toptentuesday

This week’s Top Ten Tuesday topic is:

 

 

Rainy Day Reads

 

The idea of a rainy day read is a bit puzzling to me. Maybe it’s because I grew up in Southeast Asia where it rains A LOT. And by rain, I mean a heavy storm, the dark clouds looming, the sky shattering with lightning bolts, the booms and cracks of heart-stopping thunder and then the immense heavy rain that pours down for ages and ages. Until it finally stops and it’s ridiculously hot again, just hot and humid and damp all around.

So it’s hard to really qualify a “rainy day” read when it rains so much and you just learn to ignore it and work around it.

I’m going to instead list some book quotes that make me think of rain and rainy days though!

Wuthering Heights – Emily Brontë

“On an afternoon in October, or the beginning of November – a fresh watery afternoon, when the turf and paths were rustling with moist, withered leaves, and the cold blue sky was half hidden by clouds – dark grey streamers, rapidly mounting from the west, and boding abundant rain – I requested my young lady to forego her ramble, because I was certain of showers.”

Norwegian Wood – Haruki Murakami

“When it’s raining like this,” said Naoko, “it feels as if we’re the only ones in the world. I wish it would just keep raining so the three of us could stay together.”

The Fiery Cross – Diana Gabaldon

I’m sure there are many instances of rain in The Outlander series, but I’m currently reading this fifth book and there’s plenty of rain in this one!

It had come on to rain: the light spatter of drops on the canvas overhead turned to a regular thrum, and the air grew live with the rush of water. It was a winter storm; no lightning lit the sky, and the looming mountains were invisible.

 

The English Patient – Michael Ondaatje

He is halfway across when he smells the rain, and then it begins to fall all over his body, clinging to him, and suddenly there is the greater weight of his clothes.

She puts her cupped palms out of the window and combs the rain into her hair.

Soul Music – Terry Pratchett
It was raining in the small, mountainous country of Llamedos. It was always raining in Llamedos. Rain was the country’s main export. It had rain mines.

Ceremony – Leslie Marmon Silko

Jungle rain had no beginning or end; it grew like foliage from the sky, branching and arching to the earth, sometimes in solid thickets entangling the islands, and other times, in tendrils of blue mist curling out of coastal clouds.


Top Ten Tuesday was created by The Broke and the Bookish in June of 2010 and was moved to That Artsy Reader Girl in January of 2018.

 

 

 

It’s Monday and we have been doing so much eating!

 

 

 

We made pizza for dinner on Friday. Lots of broccoli, mushrooms, sausages. And on the other, mini bell peppers, bacon, mushrooms and more broccoli.

 Love this xiaolongbao place near us. It’s not as pricy as Din Tai Fung and doesn’t require a long wait (as long as you go when they open at 11). And it has red bean pancake!

 

 

Currently…

 

Reading:

 

 

 I leave this little book in my car for emergencies like this when I forgot my book!

 

I’m reading this out loud to the boys. This is the second book in this series about a TV cooking competition for kids

Watching:

 How to Get Away With Murder

Listening:

 

American Like Me

Eating:

 

Drinking:

Yorkshire Gold

 

Last week:

I read:

The Plotters – Un-Su Kim

I posted:

Daisy Jones & The Six

Library Loot (April 10 to 16)

 

 

 

 

badge
It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? is a place to meet up and share what you have been, are and about to be reading over the week. This meme started with J Kaye’s Blog   and then was taken up by Sheila from Book Journey. Sheila then passed it on to Kathryn at the Book Date

 

Daisy Jones & The Six

I was a little worried about the hype surrounding this book as this was seriously a case of FOMO for me. I kept seeing the cover everywhere and I just had to read it, especially because it’s a story about a band!

And what a ride it was.

The narrative takes a while to get used to as it’s in the form of edited interviews. But I soon realized it’s like reading magazine interviews (Rolling Stone perhaps? – to be honest it’s been ages since I’ve read music magazines!) and the general idea is a “Behind The Band” story set in the 1970s.

The Six were a band of well, six people, two of whom are brothers. Billy Dunne is the “leader” of the band, but not really, as the band is supposed to be a democracy. But come on…

“If the rest of the world was silver, Daisy was gold.”

Daisy Jones is an up and coming singer. She’s enigmatic and wild. And absolutely beautiful.

A producer puts them together to make a record and the Six, now Daisy Jones & The Six, go from tiny clubs to topping the charts.

Daisy Jones & The Six is an enticing read. It takes a while to sink into the dialogue-only narrative but when you get used to it, what a ball of a time you’ll have. You’ll feel like you’re hanging out with the band as they relive their best (and worst) moments.

I felt that the dialogue format could be a bit limiting in terms of creating a more complete immersion into the 70s.

And really, at the end of it all, I was wanting more. More specifically, I was disappointed because these were not songs I could actually listen to! How I wish that the Daisy Jones playlist on Spotify were actual songs from The Six and not a compilation of 70s music, much as I enjoyed the songs on it! I guess I’ll just have to wait for the miniseries!

Library Loot (April 10 to 16)

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

 

It’s Wednesday! Happy Library Loot Day!

What did you get from your library this week? Claire has the link-up!

Just a couple of books for me this Library Loot. I’m attempting to read more from my own shelves this month! But since I do co-host this meme, I need something from the library too!

 

Internment – Samira Ahmed

I love this cover. And also, I previously enjoyed Ahmed’s Love Hate and Other Filters

Rebellions are built on hope.

Set in a horrifying near-future United States, seventeen-year-old Layla Amin and her parents are forced into an internment camp for Muslim American citizens.

With the help of newly made friends also trapped within the internment camp, her boyfriend on the outside, and an unexpected alliance, Layla begins a journey to fight for freedom, leading a revolution against the internment camp’s Director and his guards.

Heart-racing and emotional, Internment challenges readers to fight complicit silence that exists in our society today

 

Fearless Females: The Fight for Freedom, Equality, and Sisterhood – Marta Breen

This beautifully illustrated graphic novel tells the stories of fearless females who have fought, and continue to fight, for the rights of women today.

Featuring familiar icons like Harriet Tubman and Malala Yousafzai, and introducing hidden figures like Táhirih, young readers will be fascinated reading about these women activists advocating for equality, education, and bodily integrity all throughout history, and it is sure to inspire a new generation of activists

 

The kids’ loot:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What did you get from your library this week?

 

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you). 

It’s Monday

 

Did you take part in the readathon over the weekend? I sort of did. I knew I wouldn’t be able to do very much as my parents are in town and we would go out and do things, but I still wanted to join in for a bit. And I ended up reading four comics on Saturday!

 

Here’s what else we did this weekend:

Took my Dad to Texas Roadhouse for prime rib and those delicious soft buns that they have.

 

Did lots of gardening. We’ve had such a wet winter this year in Northern California – it was just raining again last week – and I haven’t been able to really get out there and handle all the weeds and plants that didn’t make it through the winter! I finally got to doing that, did some tilling of the soil, and hopefully the kids can plant some of their seeds soon. They selected some vegetables and some flowers and I haven’t exactly been successful planting flowers from seed (except sunflowers) so I hope they won’t be disappointed!

 

The 8yo and I made this Vermont Whole Wheat Oatmeal Honey Bread (recipe from King Arthur Flour) and it was fun teaching him how to knead the dough.

 

Currently…

 

Reading:

 

 

 

Watching:

I started watching How To Get Away With Murder and am hooked!

 

Eating:

Godiva soft serve

Drinking:

Water

 

Last week:

I read:

The Serpent Sea – Martha Wells
Daisy Jones & The Six Taylor – Jenkins Reid
A Woman Is No Man – Etaf Ram
The Backstagers Vol 1: Rebels Without Applause – James Tynion , Illustrated by Rian Sygh
Backstagers Vol 2 – James Tynion , Illustrated by Rian Sygh
Moonstruck Vol 2: Some Enchanted Evening – Grace Ellis
The Diary of Anne Frank: graphic novel – Anne Frank, adapted by Ari Folman, David Polonksy (illustrator)

I posted:

 

#WeekendCooking Funfetti birthday cake

Library Loot (April 3 to 9)

Things That Make Me Pick Up a Book #TopTenTuesday

 

 

badge
It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? is a place to meet up and share what you have been, are and about to be reading over the week. This meme started with J Kaye’s Blog   and then was taken up by Sheila from Book Journey. Sheila then passed it on to Kathryn at the Book Date