#WeekendCooking Black Sesame Ice-cream recipe

I’m back again with another ice-cream recipe!

This one was the husband’s idea. I was just asking him what ice-cream flavour I should make next and he said black sesame. If you’ve not had it before, it sometimes can be found at Japanese restaurants and Japanese supermarkets. And it’s always black sesame, not white sesame.

Black sesame ice-cream is not pretty. In fact, it looks a bit like cement. But it is very delicious. It has an almost nutty flavour, without the nuts of course.

It was a bit harder to find a black sesame recipe and to be honest, after trying a coconut ice-cream recipe online that did not work at all, I’m wary of online ice-cream recipes. So far the ice-cream recipes I’ve used are from David Leibovitz’s book The Perfect Scoop, or adapted from there. And once you get that custard recipe down, you can try experimenting with different flavors, and that is what I did here.

I did check out recipes online for how to get that sesame paste and while some of them recommended making your own, I didn’t have a food processor and wasn’t quite sure that my immersion blender would do a good job with grinding up the sesame. So instead I went to my local Asian supermarket and looked for black sesame paste. It wasn’t the kind recommended by blogs like Just One Cookbook who used a Japanese brand.

What I found was a Taiwanese-made paste and for some reason, several different kinds of sesame powder. Apparently black sesame drinks are a thing in Taiwan (and it seems in Korea too). In Singapore you can find a hot Chinese dessert that is called Black Sesame Soup, where the sesame is ground fine and often thickened with rice. Black sesame paste is also found in sweet rice flour dumplings called tangyuan. And looking up black sesame recipes, I found this intriguing Black Sesame Porridge recipe, made with rice and black sesame.

And here is my Black Sesame ice-cream recipe

4 tbsp Black Sesame powder
3 tbsp Black Sesame paste
1 cup (250ml) whole milk
2 cups (500 ml) heavy cream
5 egg yolks
120g brown sugar
Big pinch of salt

Warm the milk, sugar and 1 cup of the heavy cream in a medium saucepan. Stir in the Black Sesame powder and salt. Do not boil.

Place remaining 1 cup of heavy cream in large bowl (I use a big pyrex measuring cup). In a medium bowl, whisk yolks. Slowly pour some of the warmed milk mixture into the egg yolks to temper them. And then add the warmed egg and milk mixture back into the saucepan.

Keep stirring over medium heat until the custard forms. The custard should coat your spatula and I test this by running my finger down the spatula and if that little line my finger makes remains, you’re all done. Remove from heat.

Pour the custard into the cream. Usually I put a strainer over the cream and pour it through but I wasn’t sure if that would sift out the black sesame! So I skipped that bit.

Stir in the Black Sesame paste, making sure to scrape the bottom.

You can cool this in an ice bath or cover with plastic wrap and pop into the fridge. Chill it thoroughly for a few hours at least. And then follow your ice-cream machine’s instructions.

 

Weekend Cooking at Beth Fish Reads is open to anyone who has any kind of food-related post to share: Book (novel, nonfiction) reviews, cookbook reviews, movie reviews, recipes, random thoughts, gadgets, quotations, beer, wine, photographs

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South Pole Station by #BookBeginnings #Friday56

Beginning:

Do you ever have pain in your chest unrelated to indigestion?

Are you often sad?

Do you have digestion problems due to stress?

Do you have problems with authority?

How many alcoholic drinks do you consume a week? A day?

Would you rather be a florist or a truck driver?

True or false: I like to read about science.

True or false: Sometimes I just feel like killing myself.

(It’s a bit long I know, but I think that this quotation works far better if I include the last line)

 

56:

Cooper climbed back up the sloping granite outcropping and looked down at her feet, at the bones of the continent. It seemed as if everything around her – the spiny arms of the pines bent over the water, the crackle of the fire she hadn’t let die in the night, even the persimmon clouds of dawn – had receded completely. The silence was crystalline.

 

 

Fridays are for Book Beginnings on Rose City Reader, Friday 56 on Freda’s Voice

 

 

 

The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon

The House of Berethnet has ruled Inys for a thousand years. Still unwed, Queen Sabran the Ninth must conceive a daughter to protect her realm from destruction—but assassins are getting closer to her door.

Ead Duryan is an outsider at court. Though she has risen to the position of lady-in-waiting, she is loyal to a hidden society of mages. Ead keeps a watchful eye on Sabran, secretly protecting her with forbidden magic.

Across the dark sea, Tané has trained all her life to be a dragonrider, but is forced to make a choice that could see her life unravel.

Meanwhile, the divided East and West refuse to parley, and forces of chaos are rising from their sleep

I usually prefer to describe the book in my own words but this one is tricky. It is a busy, complex world with societies that have been divided because of their beliefs. But essentially there is a Big Bad and it has been in exile for a thousand years, and guess what, those thousand years are now ending.

But before we get to all of that there is so much of this wonderful world-building to explore. And I feel like you really need to enjoy discovering and wandering through all the author’s worldbuilding when it comes to this book. It does take a while to build up, it does take a while for things to happen and at 848 pages, this is quite an investment. Don’t get discouraged though, because once the pieces begin to fall into place it is glorious.

I’m trying not to spoil anything for anyone here so bullet points to the rescue. Here’s what I loved about this book:

  • women-centred
  • there are dragons and dragon-riders!
  • (but also societies that fear and hate dragons)
  • magic
  • some politicking and power play
  • it’s a standalone, so no need to be desperately waiting for the sequel

Here’s some things that I didn’t like so much:

  • The Big Bad felt a bit like evil for evil’s sake. There didn’t seem to be much of a concrete explanation for what it’s doing
  • It is very long and takes a while to get going. Not everyone has the kind of patience required for a book like this. Perhaps if this wasn’t a library ebook maybe I wouldn’t have read it so fast – the Libby app is especially good at alerting one to the fact that “xx people are waiting” for this book. Which meant that when my time with the book was up, I’d have to put it on hold and wait again. So of course I’m going to finish reading it before that nonsense happens!

Library Loot (July 10 to 16)

badge-4Library Loot is a weekly event co-hosted by Claire from The Captive Reader and Sharlene from Real Life Reading that encourages bloggers to share the books they’ve checked out from the library. If you’d like to participate, just write up your post-feel free to steal the button-and link it using the Mr. Linky any time during the week. And of course check out what other participants are getting from their libraries.

 

Happy Library Loot day everyone!

 

I feel like I haven’t read fiction by Japanese writers for a while. So here is one.

Where Europe Begins – Yoko Tadawa

Where Europe Begins presents a collection of startling new stories by Japanese writer Yoko Tawada. Moving through landscapes of fairy tales, family history, strange words and letters, dreams, and every-day reality, Tawada’s work blurs divisions between fact and fiction, prose and poetry. Often set in physical spaces as disparate as Japan, Siberia, Russia, and Germany, these tales describe a fragmented world where even a city or the human body can become a sort of text. Suddenly, the reader becomes as much a foreigner as the author and the figures that fill this book: the ghost of a burned woman, a woman traveling on the Trans-Siberian railroad, a mechanical doll, a tongue, a monk who leaps into his own reflection. Tawada playfully makes the experience of estrangement — of a being in-between — both sensual and bewildering, and as a result practically invents a new way of seeing things while telling a fine story.

I found this book in a climate fiction list and thought it sounded a bit different.

South Pole Station – Ashley Shelby

Do you have digestion problems due to stress? Do you have problems with authority? How many alcoholic drinks do you consume a week? Would you rather be a florist or a truck driver?

These are some of the questions that determine if you have what it takes to survive at South Pole Station, a place with an average temperature of -54°F and no sunlight for six months a year. Cooper Gosling has just answered five hundred of them. Her results indicate she is sufficiently resilient for Polar life.

Cooper’s not sure if this is an achievement, but she knows she has nothing to lose. Unmoored by a recent family tragedy, she’s adrift at thirty and—despite her early promise as a painter—on the verge of sinking her career. So she accepts her place in the National Science Foundation’s Artists & Writers Program and flees to Antarctica—where she encounters a group of misfits motivated by desires as ambiguous as her own. There’s Pearl, the Machiavellian cook with the Pollyanna attitude; Sal, an enigmatic astrophysicist whose experiment might change the world; and Tucker, the only uncloseted man on the continent, who, as station manager, casts a weary eye on all.

The only thing the Polies have in common is the conviction that they don’t belong anywhere else. Then a fringe scientist arrives, claiming climate change is a hoax. His presence will rattle this already imbalanced community, bringing Cooper and the Polies to the center of a global controversy and threatening the ancient ice chip they call home.

A winning comedy of errors set in the world’s harshest place, Ashley Shelby’s South Pole Station is a wry and witty debut novel about the courage it takes to band together, even as everything around you falls apart.

 

 

After reading Ruth Reichl’s Save Me the Plums, I’ve been wanting to read DFW’s essay on lobsters which she discusses in her book.

Consider the Lobster and other essays – David Foster Wallace (audiobook)

Do lobsters feel pain? Did Franz Kafka have a funny bone? What is John Updike’s deal, anyway? And what happens when adult video starlets meet their fans in person? David Foster Wallace answers these questions and more in essays that are also enthralling narrative adventures. Whether covering the three-ring circus of a vicious presidential race, plunging into the wars between dictionary writers, or confronting the World’s Largest Lobster Cooker at the annual Maine Lobster Festival, Wallace projects a quality of thought that is uniquely his and a voice as powerful and distinct as any in American letters.

Contains: “Big Red Son,” “Certainly the End of Something or Other, One Would Sort of Have to Think,” “Some Remarks on Kafka’s Funniness from Which Probably Not Enough Has Been Removed,” “Authority and American Usage,” “The View from Mrs. Thompson’s,” “How Tracy Austin Broke My Heart,” “Up, Simba,” “Consider the Lobster,” “Joseph Frank’s Dostoevsky” and “Host.”

 

The kids’ loot:

 

(Well usually here I’ll put up a photo of the kids’ library haul but we haven’t been to the library yet this week and are supposed to go this afternoon. So I’ll update it later with a photo!)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What did you get from your library this week?

 

This post contains affiliate links from Book Depository.  If you buy via these links it means I receive a small commission (at no extra cost to you). 

Books read in June

In June, I traveled far and wide via my reading!

Some places I explored in books were Tahiti, Alaska, Korea, Germany, India, and some were set right here in California.

Peasprout Chen, Future Legend of Skate and Sword – Henry Lien
Moon Rush – Leonard David
The Professor – Charlotte Bronte
Save Me the Plums – Ruth Reichl
Unmarriageable – Soniah Kamal
My So-Called Bollywood Life – Nisha Sharma
The totally awesome Hulk. Vol. 1, Cho time  – Greg Pak
Kid Gloves: Nine months of careful chaos – Lucy Knisley
Tiare in bloom – Celestine Vaite
The Siren Depths – Martha Wells
If You Leave Me – Crystal Hana Kim
The Snow Child – Eowyn Ivey
The Aftermath-  Rhidian Brook
The Proposal – Jasmine Guillory
Sadie – Courtney Summers
A Fire Story – Brian Fies

It’s Monday

 

 

Happy Monday!

I’m sending the kids off to a Rocks and Minerals camp this week. Hope they learn all kinds of fun things!

Meanwhile here are some things we did last week:

Ate at a French bistro in Yountville – I had tomato soup and as my main course, rabbit

 

Bought pastries from Bouchon Bakery (it’s part of the Thomas Keller group). Lovely lemon meringue tart, fruit tart, chocolate eclair and what’s called “Oh Ohs” that wrapped chocolate cake at the back.

Made bread with the tangzhong method.

 

Food Truck Friday complete with kids play area (mini golf, table tennis etc). Tried arepas for the first time.

 

Lots of park and playground days as that’s what summer is all about!

 

Currently…

 

Reading:

The Priory of the Orange Tree – Samantha Shannon

(I’ll probably be done with this by the time this post is up tomorrow though!)

 

 

Watching:

Stranger Things Season 3

Listening:

Consider the Lobster and other essays by David Foster Wallace

 

Latest crochet project:

Eating:

Homemade raisin scone for breakfast

Drinking:

Yorkshire Gold with milk

Cooking:

I’m about to make some pizza rolls for the kids for their lunches this week – just homemade pizza dough, some ham and cheese and tomato paste.

Last week:

I read:

A Fire Story – Brian Fies
Spider-Gwen Vol 1: Greater Power – Jason LaTour, Robbi Rodriguez
Spider-Gwen Vol 2: Weapon of Choice – Jason LaTour, Robbi Rodriguez
Black Widow Vol 1: SHIELD’s Most Wanted – Mark Waid, Chris Samnee
Record of a Spaceborn Few – Becky Chambers
Beijing comrades – Bei Tong

I posted:

#WeekendCooking Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookie

Library Loot (July 3 to 10)

Sadie by Courtney Summers

 

badge
It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? is a place to meet up and share what you have been, are and about to be reading over the week. This meme started with J Kaye’s Blog   and then was taken up by Sheila from Book Journey. Sheila then passed it on to Kathryn at the Book Date

 

#WeekendCooking Oatmeal Chocolate Chip Cookie

I love chocolate chip cookies. I have tried several chocolate chip cookie recipes over the years. One of the best I’ve ever had is this one from Serious Eats – it makes for an amazing (seriously AMAZING) chocolate chip cookie – but sometimes I feel the need for an oatmeal chocolate chip cookie.

I don’t know, maybe I’m just trying to trick myself into thinking it’s a healthier cookie.

But I do also like that chewiness that oatmeal cookies have.

Anyway, the first time I made this recipe, the cookies spread a bit too much so I adapted the recipe slightly. Please refer to King Arthur Flour for the original recipe.

  • 227g (1 cup) unsalted butter, at room temperature
  • 220g light brown sugar
  • 2 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 1 tbsp vanilla extract
  • 50g whole-wheat white flour
  • 170g All-Purpose Flour
  • 120g quick-cooking or old-fashioned oats
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt or 3/4 teaspoon regular table salt
  • 300g semisweet chocolate chips
  1. Preheat the oven to 325°F. Line several cookie sheets with parchment paper
  2. Using a mixer, beat together the butter and sugar until smooth.
  3. Beat in the eggs and vanilla.
  4. Whisk together the flours, oats, baking powder, baking soda, and salt, and add to the butter mixture in the bowl.
  5. Mix until everything is thoroughly incorporated. Scrape the bottom and sides of the bowl, and mix briefly.
  6. Stir in the chocolate chips.
  7. Scoop the dough onto the prepared baking sheets, leaving about 1 1/2″ to 2″ between cookies.
  8. Bake the cookies for 12 to 15 minutes, until light golden brown, with slightly darker edges. 
  9. Remove the cookies from the oven, and when they’re set enough to handle, transfer them to racks to cool.

 

 

Weekend Cooking at Beth Fish Reads is open to anyone who has any kind of food-related post to share: Book (novel, nonfiction) reviews, cookbook reviews, movie reviews, recipes, random thoughts, gadgets, quotations, beer, wine, photographs